Comoy39s pipe dating

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Historical archeologists do not rely on pipe stem fragments as the only source for determining a site's history.

They also consider historical documents and other material culture recovered from the site—such as ceramics, glass, metal artifacts, faunal and botanical samples, and features—to determine its occupation and use.

By 1800 this diameter had decreased to 4/64 of an inch.

This change in diameter may have occurred because pipe stems became longer through time, requiring a smaller bore.

Initials or full name marks placed across the top of the stem were most frequently employed in central southern England and the West Midlands, while decorative stem borders were most often employed in the Midlands and north.

Long line name and place stamps orientated along the top of the stem were used in the North West region during the late eighteenth century.

Local clays with inclusions were rarely used after about 1710.The clay pipe industry expanded rapidly as tobacco smoking gained popularity in both England and America. Harrington studied the thousands of pipe stems excavated at Jamestown and other colonial Virginia sites, noticing a definite relationship between the diameter of the pipe stem bore—or hole—and the age of the pipe of which it had been part.Historical archeologists excavating English colonial sites often find pieces of white clay smoking pipes on their sites. The earliest pipes, dating to about 1600, had stems with 9/64-inch diameter bores.As a result, they are generally rather cylindrical in appearance with less evidence of any stem taper.Stem bores are sometimes as large as 7/64” but more typically in the 6/64” to 5/64” range.

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