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Over the years many air forces in the world have used wide-bodied jets to gather electronic information.But in the past two decades there has been a move to much smaller executive jets that have been adapted for monitoring, intelligence and electronic warfare.UAE as ‘end user’ An examination by Haaretz of hundreds of documents and email correspondence leaked from the Appleby law firm, in what became known as the Paradise Papers, reveals that the UAE’s military wanted to create a similar apparatus for surveillance aircraft, and the deal began to coalesce about a decade ago.The papers describe the complex structure established for acquiring and refitting the two planes: At the top is the so-called “end user” – the United Arab Emirates Armed Forces.The army signed a contract with a huge company in Abu Dhabi called Advanced Integrated Systems.The person now officially listed as CEO of AIS, Abdulla Ahmed Al Balooshi, is a member of an Emirates family known to be involved in the country’s intelligence establishment.While the United States gathers such information in the region, it does not necessarily share all of it with the UAE, says Karasik.The need for information concerning, Libya, Yemen and Iran is what has led the Emirates to invest huge sums in the acquisition of reconnaissance aircraft, he notes.

AIS then opened a subsidiary by the same name, located on the island.

C.-based Jamestown Foundation, lived in the UAE and is familiar with the country’s defense industry.

In a phone interview, Karasik explains that the reason for the Emirates’ investment in surveillance planes stems from a desire to develop the capability to gather intelligence independently.

According to a report in The Wall Street Journal this year, Israel, Saudi Arabia and the UAE regularly exchange intelligence about threats from Iran.

A study published last August by the Tony Blair Institute for Global Change estimates that Israel conducts trade with the Gulf states to a tune of

AIS then opened a subsidiary by the same name, located on the island.

C.-based Jamestown Foundation, lived in the UAE and is familiar with the country’s defense industry.

In a phone interview, Karasik explains that the reason for the Emirates’ investment in surveillance planes stems from a desire to develop the capability to gather intelligence independently.

According to a report in The Wall Street Journal this year, Israel, Saudi Arabia and the UAE regularly exchange intelligence about threats from Iran.

A study published last August by the Tony Blair Institute for Global Change estimates that Israel conducts trade with the Gulf states to a tune of $1 billion annually.

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AIS then opened a subsidiary by the same name, located on the island.C.-based Jamestown Foundation, lived in the UAE and is familiar with the country’s defense industry.In a phone interview, Karasik explains that the reason for the Emirates’ investment in surveillance planes stems from a desire to develop the capability to gather intelligence independently.According to a report in The Wall Street Journal this year, Israel, Saudi Arabia and the UAE regularly exchange intelligence about threats from Iran.A study published last August by the Tony Blair Institute for Global Change estimates that Israel conducts trade with the Gulf states to a tune of $1 billion annually.

billion annually.

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